Uncategorized

Professional Writers Series Returns Spring Semester

This spring, community members and Washington State University Vancouver students will have another opportunity to attend a series of presentations from professional, award-winning authors from a variety of genres.

The series, sponsored by the WSU Vancouver English department, will be an addition to English 499.01, a creative writing course taught by Howard Aaron, lecturer for the English department. While the course is open to WSU Vancouver students for spring registration, community members are also encouraged to attend the series of presentations.

According to Aaron, there will be six presentations over the course of the semester by writers living and working in our area. The writers will speak about the trajectory of their careers and where they have experienced both success and challenges. The goal of the course is for students to find ways to apply what they discover in this course to their own literary career paths.

The spring 2013 series included talks by award-winning authors such as Kim Stafford, Eric A. Kimmel and Peter Ames Carlin, author of “Putting the Pop into Pop Culture.” The upcoming series will include presentations from authors such as Monica Drake, Vern Rutsala, Peter Rock, Karen Karbo—author of fourteen award-winning novels, memoirs and works of non-fiction including the best-selling “Kick Ass Women” series—and more.

For updates and information about the 2014 Professional Writers Series, please visit wsu.edu, or contact Howard Aaron at haaron823@gmail.com.

 

GUEST SPEAKERS: Professional Writers Series Spring 2014

Wednesday, January 29, 7- 9 p.m.

Karen Karbo

Karen Karbo

KAREN KARBO — WRITING FROM THE HEART AND THE FUNNYBONES

Karen Karbo is the author of fourteen award-winning novels, memoirs and works of non-fiction including the best-selling “Kick Ass Women” series, the latest of which is Julia Child Rules: Lessons on Savoring Life. Whitney Otto (How to Make an American Quilt) has written that reading Julia Child Rules “is like being invited to a lively dinner party where ideas and experiences are related with great verve and wisdom.” Karbo’s other books in the series are How Georgia Became O’Keeffe; The Gospel According to Coco Chanel, and How to Hepburn. Her memoir, The Stuff of Life, about the last year she spent with her father before his death, was a New York Times Notable Book, a People Magazine Critics’ Choice, a Books for a Better Life Award finalist, and a winner of the Oregon Book Award for Creative Non-fiction. Her short stories, essays, articles and reviews have appeared in Elle, Vogue, Esquire, Outside, the New York Times, salon.com and other magazines. “Karen Karbo is a very funny writer – from near slapstick to wry wit. Amazing.” –The New York Times Wednesday, February 12, 2013, 7-9 p.m.

Photo by Arthur Shmid

Photo by Arthur Shmid

MONICA DRAKE — PARENTING THE NOVEL

Monica Drake is a novelist who received her MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Arizona and now teaches in the BFA program in writing at the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Her latest novel is The Stud Book, a sharp send-up on the complexities of contemporary motherhood as viewed by a loyal group of friends. “Drake has written a take-your-breath-away good, blow-your-mind wise, crack-your-heart-open beauty of a novel,” writes Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild and Tiny Beautiful Things. Her earlier novel, Clown Girl, was a finalist for the Ken Kesey Award for the Novel by the Oregon Book Awards. The book also won the Eric Hoffer prize for best Micro Press title and the Ippy Award for Story Teller of the Year Award from the Independent Publishers Book Awards.

Wednesday, March 5, 7- 9 p.m.

Vern Rutsala

Vern Rutsala

VERN RUTSALA — A POET’S UNCOMMON VISION

Vern Rutsala was a finalist for the National Book Award for his poetry collection, The Moment’s Equation. The author of twelve collections of poetry, Rutsala graduated from Reed College and the Iowa Writers Workshop and taught at Lewis & Clark College for over 40 years. A champion of the modern day prose poem, his works include Laments, The Journey Begins, Paragraphs, and Little-known Sports. Of the latter book, Gian Lombardo writes, “Over and over Rutsala—with his good eye for the detail, devilish twists and cheery satire—brings us to the edge between dark and light by showing us common objects and practices in a way we don’t normally see them.” Rutsala is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants, the Juniper Prize, an Oregon Book Award, two Carolyn Kizer Poetry Prizes, a Pushcart Prize, the Akron Poetry Prize, and the Northwest Poetry Prize. His work has appeared in such periodicals as New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, Nation, Harper’s and American Poetry Review.

Wednesday, March 12, 7-9 p.m.

Peter Rock

Peter Rock

PETER ROCK — THE NOVEL AS HUMAN

Peter Rock’s most recent novel, The Shelter Cycle, based on actual events, is set in Montana in 1990 when the end of the world is about to take place according to Elizabeth Clare Prophet, founder of the Church Universal and Triumphant. Novelist and screenwriter Tom Perrotta has called The Shelter Cycle “a stunning novel about faith and disillusionment and the lingering power of the past. Peter Rock illuminates a strange and little-known chapter in American religious history. At times, Rock’s uncanny ability to combine mysticism with blunt realism is reminiscent of Flannery O’Connor.” The recipient of a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University, Rock’s previous novels include the Alex Award-winning My Abandonment given by the American Library Association as well as The Bewildered, The Ambidextrist, This Is the Place, Carnival Wolves and the story collection, The Unsettling—all works which take a deeply humanistic view of characters on the fringes of society. He is on the English faculty of Reed College.

Wednesday, March 26, 7-9 p.m.

Lidia Yuknavitch

Lidia Yuknavitch

LIDIA YUKNAVITCH — BREAKING LITERARY BOUNDARIES

Novelist, memoirist and short story writer Lidia Yuknavitch’s latest work is Dora: A Head Case, based on Sigmund Freud’s most famous case study of 18-year-old Ida Bauer. Chuck Palahniuk (The Fight Club and Choke) wrote in the book’s introduction, “In Dora, [Yuknavitch] takes the most classic model of Thera-tainment, personal-crisis-as-entertainment, and she re-imagines it wonderfully reversed…It is revenge as the ultimate therapy.” Among the author’s other books is the celebrated memoir, The Chronology of Water, and the short fiction works Her Other Mouths, Liberty’s Excess, and Real to Reel. Yuknavitch’s work has appeared in Ms., The Iowa Review, Exquisite Corpse, Fiction International, Zyzzyva, and elsewhere. She was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award and the recipient of awards and fellowships from Poets and Writers and Literary Arts, Inc. She teaches writing, literature, film, and Women’s Studies in Oregon. Wednesday, April 9, 7- 9 p.m.

Lee Montgomery

Lee Montgomery

LEE MONTGOMERY — PUBLISHING PLATFORMS: OLD vs. NEW

For more than a decade, Lee Montgomery served as the associate publisher and editorial director of Tin House Books, executive director of Tin House Magazine, and founder director of the Tin House Writers Workshop. She currently runs New Babylon Books, an editorial consulting agency and is the editor of a new ebook platform launching in February called Shebooks. She is also a fellow at the Atheneum Master Writers Program. Previously, she was the fiction editor for the Iowa Review and editor of the Santa Monica Review and the editor of numerous anthologies. Montgomery is the author of The Things Between Us, A Memoir, winner of the Oregon Book Award for Creative Nonfiction, Whose World Is This? Stories, winner of the Iowa Short Fiction Award, and Searching for Emily: Illustrated. A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, her work has appeared in such publications as The New York Times magazine, Glimmer Train, Black Clock, Iowa Review, Denver Quarterly, Story Magazine, Alaska Quarterly and the Antioch Review.

Print Friendly

Comments are closed.